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Isolated Malware Incident: Incident Report for AWeber — 2 Comments

  1. Speaking of aweber.com, remember that “connection refused” problem I was having with the HTTS email links?

    Finally occurred to me to look in my HOSTS file, and sure enough, aweber.com was blocked.

    Now, my HOSTS file came from the Microsoft professionals network, meaning it’s fairly well-vetted and not just arbitrary hatin’ on some types of sites. But domains with no real function other than adserving or redirecting do get listed. And that’s probably how it came to be.

    Actually, there were two:

    127.0.0.1 analytics.aweber.com
    127.0.0.1 clicks.aweber.com

    I would bet every call to the latter also calls the former, but not where you can see it. What happens to that data??

    Me, I’d consider hosting that includes fullblown mailing list abilities and run it off my own domain.

    • “Me, I’d consider hosting that includes fullblown mailing list abilities and run it off my own domain.”

      Yeah, I considered that, too. And then I realized that three or four bogus spam complaints from folks who use the “Mark Email As Spam” button as a quick way to unsubscribe from a mailing list, and I’d be marked as a spammer.

      And you think I could negotiate with Google Gmail, or domain hosts that offer email services, or internet providers like Verizon or Comcast, to get that crap fixed?

      Or that I have time?

      I thought long and hard about the issues I’d face, and there are some jobs you farm out to the folks who specialize in it, because the consequences of not doing so would be unbelievably destructive. This was one of those times, and AWeber is both really good at what it does, and does it transparently, so that if there’s a problem, they’ll let you know, and you can let your people know.

      As above.

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