Heyr, Pete, and a touch of Lauren

I got a lot done this morning, but not everything. Got eleven scenes for Heyr mapped out, and eleven for Pete, and one or two for Lauren. I’m getting a feel for the themes this book will explore, though I can’t really say that the main conflict has jelled for me completely yet — I’m still very much finding my way through the dark with nothing but fingertips and sense of smell, and there are times when this leads to some disorientation.

For example, I developed one scene idea that I like a lot, but that runs counter to most of what I’ve done so far. So, do I dump that scene, which I think would be powerful and compelling, or do I develop a counter-story subplot that would add layers and complexity (or perhaps confusion and fog) to the clearer scenes, or do I rework the other scenes, which all seem to point in that other direction, in order to make them support this one scene more obviously? Or do I just let it hang, and keep throwing things onto notecards, and see what happens when I start playing connect-the-dots with them in a couple of days.

Don’t know.

Writing a novel is no more a familiar process the twenty-somethingth time than it was the first. In fact, I think the first time might have been easier, because I had on blinders and didn’t see what an immense terrain I was trying to find my way across.

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About the author: Novelist, writing teacher, on a mission to reprint my out-of-print books and self-publish my new ones.

2 comments… add one
  • Jon Aug 19, 2002 @ 10:02

    Seems to me, that since you’ve not started actually writing the book yet, you’ve got a chance to make the cool scene work instead of having to scrap it because it doesn’t fit . . . when you get the amazing moments, if they can work, you probably shouldn’t scrap ’em… too often you have to kill your babies because they don’t fit in the finished story. Why not see if you can make it work, since you have the chance?

    -Jon

  • Joel Aug 18, 2002 @ 1:06

    "Writing a novel is no more a familiar process the twenty-somethingth time than it was the first. In fact, I think the first time might have been easier, because I had on blinders and didn’t see what an immense terrain I was trying to find my way across."

    Perhaps, Holly, but you don’t have the fear if you can even write a novel like many of us newbies. You’ve DONE it! 😀

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