Depressing and Creepy

I live a quiet life (these days, anyway). I don’t go anywhere, I don’t have any sort of in-the-flesh presence anywhere, I don’t do cons or signings. To everyone in the world except for the tiny handful of people who actually know me, I’m either letters on a page or letters on a screen.

So it comes as a fresh shock to me every time I trip over some little online nest of people who can’t stand me, even though none of them know me. These are folks who take umbrage at the beginner workshops I’ve posted on my site, and who are offended because, A) these beginner workshops—meant to help folks who have been stuck on their writing and unable to get unstuck move forward—are not in-depth or difficult, so by some sort of insane extension, B) I must have created everything I’ve ever done using beginner workshops. They’ll review nonfiction books of mine they admit they haven’t read, put off by the fact that I dare to suggest that some of the simpler things can be done in only five minutes. As if that means you have to have them done in five minutes, and can’t put more time and work into them. They’ll loathe me for making money on my writing. The simple fact of my existence is an offense to them. They can’t stand my novels, either, because those are fantasy that sold commercially, and therefore must be either Tolkien Clones or D&D clones (with D&D being the acknowledged Tolkien Clone of all time). What….read them? God, no. Couldn’t do that. Something might rub off.

In the same way that discovering maggots under a log is both horrifying and fascinating, discovering that there are people who loathe you, personally, even though you didn’t even know they existed and have never done anything to them is horrifying and fascinating.

It’s also something that happens to all writers who have any level of professional success. (Any level. Not just to big names.) Therefore, something you might want to keep in mind on your forward drive to publication. Definitely one of the parts of the job that will creep you out.

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About the author: Novelist, writing teacher, on a mission to reprint my out-of-print books and self-publish my new ones.

48 comments… add one
  • arohen Sep 14, 2006 @ 20:44

    I love the web page. I love the blog. I love the podcast. That’s a lot of love.

    I wouldn’t have gotten as far as I have without the wisdom and common sense that I’ve found on your site. Don’t let it get you down that there are petty people out there who just want to rain on the party. There are a lot more of us out here that owe you a great big dept of gratitude. Thanks for everything you’ve shared.

  • zette Sep 11, 2006 @ 14:18

    Let me tell you a quick story.

    I sometimes go off to Google to look up things like Forward Motion and Vision just to see what people are saying. And do you know what they say?

    That Holly Lisle’s site, her workshop, and the effort she has put into helping others is incredible, helpful, and a wonderful gift.

    Hundreds and hundreds of them.

    (Yeah, well, I’d like to see my name associated with Forward Motion and Vision more often, but at least people like them!)

    Try looking up the name of any of the people involved in this other group and see if they do as well.

    I suspect what you have really hit is envy, Holly.

  • hollylisle Sep 11, 2006 @ 9:07

    To tonydyer—No, it would not be useful if I pointed you to the source of the comments. It would be a bad idea, because it would incite a flamewar.

    You’re calling for the moral high ground (and doing it in pretty suspect language, so I suspect what you’re actually looking for is a flamewar). NOT naming names and NOT accusing anyone of being an asshole (while skipping the ever-tempting opportunity to provide proof that some of them are assholes, admittedly) IS the moral high ground. Restraint, amigo. Restraint.

    I am not interested in sending the folks who like me or my work over to a site where people generally don’t. What would happen is that some people would feel obliged to defend me and would post comments to those who don’t like me. This would be followed by those who don’t like me flaming those who do (and in all likelihood coming over here and screaming bloody murder about me sending people over there).

    I don’t need to be defended. I’m entirely capable of recognizing hostility and dislike and both overt and veiled insult, and entirely capable of walking away.

    It would be heresay if I named names but didn’t provide proof. If I do a general rant about creepy people, though, it’s just commentary.

  • hollylisle Sep 11, 2006 @ 8:21

    Hi, folks. Thank you for your encouragement. I’ve also been very moved by your stories posted here, and I hope that when those of you who are pushing for publication start selling, you’ll let me know.

    I can’t say this is a thankless job—it isn’t. It’s a job where praise can be effusive and occasionally overwhelming. Unlike motherhood and registered nursing, the other two careers I pursued or continue to pursue, however, nearly everything happens in public, both praise and criticism. You get both of those in any job, and you’ll invariably receive a mix of deserved and undeserved cheers and boos.

    It can be tempting to believe all the good stuff and to blow off all the bad stuff. Being Tao about the whole experience is harder, and for all that I focus on taking the Tao perspective, I did not come into the world viewing life through the Taoist lens (I’m naturally type A, decidedly on the aggressive side, with an unfortunate tendency toward /a/r/g/u/m/e/n/t/ debate that even after years and years of effort has not been entirely tamed). The way of water does not come easily to me. But I’m working on it.

    Which brings me back around to my point. Finding those hostile folks took me off guard. I’ve been around this track a bunch of times before, though, (and my opinionated personality made me a nice, big target, so I’ve taken plenty of hits on the way) and while poison darts still hurt, I’ve developed a pretty thick hide and some immunity. So, after about an hour of being angry and hurt, I realized that nothing they said changed anything.

    People who are just getting started generally haven’t, and finding yourself publicly shredded can, the first few times, be devastating—to the point, in at least one case that I know of, and surely a few cases that I don’t, of causing someone who was making good headway in writing to give up on her dreams and just walk away.

    I’m not in any danger of giving up and walking away because people who don’t know me, don’t like me and say nasty things about me. Some of you, I suspect, are getting close to achieving the “pro” step on your dream sheet, though, and you need to realize that the poison darts fly pretty thick around the chute where the new pros are released into the wild.

    Watch your backs. Shake it off. Keep running. Don’t be another casualty of hostile intent.

  • Like_A_Machine Sep 10, 2006 @ 19:36

    Don’t dwell on it. You’re too damn talented, and thoughtful to care about what some people think. If they don’t want to respect you, that’s fine, but if they want to disrespect you where it is publicly viewable, that is very sad, and doesn’t deserve anything but to be ignored.

    People like that are the same kind of people who shun heavy metal for being ‘simple’, when in fact, like you’re writing, it is anything but.

  • sketchinartist Sep 10, 2006 @ 16:38

    They’re dissing you as a Tolkien/D&D clone when you’ve got a 70 or so percent focus on building original (scratch that, unique–I listen to the podcasts) worlds and cultures?

    There ought to be a sock that takes care of that.

  • tonydyer Sep 10, 2006 @ 11:04

    I have a high level of repect for Holly Lisle who has spent a considerable amount of time paying forward to help all of us. I have read Holly’s work for many years and I am personally encouraged to write through the motivation she has given me. That said, should we not look at thinks in a unemotional way so that we can find the truth of the matter, which is usually somewhere in the middle.
    As for spelling, and possibly grammar, if they’re the only flaws in what I posted then your struggling.
    I suggest that we thank Holly for what she has given us.

  • Kathleenbolton Sep 10, 2006 @ 6:58

    I believe the word is “sycophantic” tonydyer. If you’re going to throw a convoluted and grammatically suspect troll bomb in the hope of convincing others you really CAN write, then at least get the spelling right.

  • cherylp Sep 9, 2006 @ 22:08

    About the same sort of pleasure I imagine, tonydyer, that folks like you feel by posting a superior-toned, chiding message about someone whom I doubt you’ve met in person and wouldn’t know if you met on the street, but make uninformed judgements about him or her anyway.

  • tcastleb Sep 9, 2006 @ 18:26

    I just wanted to add my support to everyone else’s. About three and a half years ago I was stuck in a crummy job and freezing in my parents’ basement and starting my second book to ignore it all. I found the Forward Motion site, and all your wonderful articles there, and one in particular, “Could vs. Should,” stuck in my head, especially the line about “How much is your dream worth to you?”

    I figured it was worth damn near everything, so I took that advice to heart and packed up my car and moved to San Diego (a city I’ve always loved) a few months later and have since finished three more books and attended Clarion last year and a couple of big cons this year. So I just wanted to say thanks for helping me find the courage to follow the writing path, and for all the wonderful articles on that site that helped when I really needed it. I don’t have anything out yet, but I will. Soon.

    I was hoping I’d get to tell you in person after I saw you were coming out to San Diego, but alas, it’s not meant to be. Someday, hopefully. Talyn is here on my counter, and I can’t wait to read it.

  • BookLover Sep 9, 2006 @ 16:04

    Books one, two and three of The World Gates arrived yesterday. “The Secret Texts” trilogy was an experience I cherish, and I hold in my memory much of the characters, plot and action, like times with special friends. I’m waiting until Monday to start The World Gates, so I can give it the attention it deserves. If I thought you had time, and patience, I’d add more considered, personal and rational support. Let “Thank You!” suffice for now.

  • Irtanu Sep 9, 2006 @ 13:15

    You almost succeeded there, tony. Nice try.

  • tonydyer Sep 9, 2006 @ 13:11

    Some things and people never change as does their need to live of the selective vicarious pleasure that flows from sicophantic and irrational support!

  • Irtanu Sep 9, 2006 @ 12:42

    It’s about time I stop being an anonymous fan. I’ve been here for, wow, coming up on twenty months. I first came across you when I was desperate for writing advice, support, ANYTHING, and I Googled writing communities, and there was Forward Motion. I read many of the articles multiple times. Here was solid, logical, no-bullshit advice from a successful author. And, it all applied to my own work.

    I was then determined to read a book by you, and I chose Diplomacy of the Wolves, if only for the fact that your sample map had actually been used in a published and successful series. And what a choice it was. It was then and there that I realized I had made the character decision in who to look towards for advice.

    Since then, I’ve created a completely realized language for my world. The language is called Arrell, if you’re curious, and the world is Irtanu. Your words of wisdom and support sparked me to continue to write, and the bulk of book has been created solely because, through your articles, I believed that my dream was not foolish. I now knew it to be worthwhile.

    I guess I’d just like to thank you for everything you have done. I thank you for being a mentor to me, unbeknownst to you. I thank you for being my guide. Your article about the fact that authors are commonly more depressed has really been uplifting. I cannot thank you enough. And as for the naysayers, do what I do, just laugh. It really is rather amusing to waste so much energy and time in such a despicable, worthless manner towards a great person.

    I think I’ve rambled enough. In summary, thanks for helping me achieve my dream.

  • Angelique Sep 9, 2006 @ 10:02

    Unfortunately is seems that for every solid ally youhave there are three or four idiots out there willing to attack simply because they can. I guarantee that any one of these ‘haters’ wouldn’t have the balls to say directly to your face what they say hidden safely behind an internet connection. Of course it hurts. Just try to remember the solid little posse you have here. You have touched and therefore changed all of our lives for the positive. Had it not been for your ‘beginner workshops’ my love for writing wouldn’t have been reignited. Let those others wallow in their pettiness. What goes around comes around.

  • eponin Sep 9, 2006 @ 9:01

    I have to honestly say, Holly, that your workshops are what got me started writing, what helped me realize I could write, even though just about everyone I knew thought writing was worthless.

    What you’ve written has inspired me and I can honestly say I aspire to write as well as you do. You’re one of the few authors I’ll buy in hardback or paper, as soon as a book comes out.

    ~ Eponin

  • Nicole Sep 8, 2006 @ 18:54

    Yet another supporter chiming in.

    There truly are two – or more – of us for every one of them. We who read it love your writing, Holly, and can’t wait for more, fiction or non.

    Thank you for what you do.

  • PolarBear Sep 8, 2006 @ 17:51

    Invalid criticism still stings. I’m sorry you have to deal with it. Hugs.

  • wordworker Sep 8, 2006 @ 17:16

    Holly, I’ve never met you. I’ve been reading you online for more than a year. I love checking in here, love the podcasts and the pieces of yourself that you’ve revealed on your site. To hell with the ‘sour grapes clubs’.

  • Kathleenbolton Sep 8, 2006 @ 15:05

    Well, we love you over at Writer Unboxed. We’ve been discussing your One-Pass Manuscript Revision technique for the past three months now (I’m using it for the first time myself and I gotta say I’m blown away by your sheer dogged output).

    In this business, people love to knock others. It makes them feel better in some sick way. But in the doing it also reveals them for the cretins that they are. I wouldn’t waste one wink of sleep on them.

  • Anthea Sep 8, 2006 @ 14:26

    Right after Talyn came out, I loaned it to a friend of mine who hadn’t read any of your books yet. We talked after she was a couple of chapters in, and she said “It’s very well written, but I can see exactly where it’s going, and what’s going to happen next.”

    I kept quiet of course, knowing that experience is the best teacher. When she gave the book back we discussed it some more, and she said “Wow, that was incredible, I didn’t guess any of what happened. I kept reading, and realizing that what I expected wasn’t what was happening, and it made me want to read more and more! Do you have anything else by her?”

    She read through my whole collection of your books in about two months 😀

    Just thought I’d share what an amazing impact your books have on the people who do read them! And thank you, for keeping at it in spite of the vipers who spread their poison and try to bring you and other writers down. I’m looking forward to Hawkspar immensely!

  • tonydyer Sep 8, 2006 @ 13:35

    It would be usefull if Holly could point us to the source of these comments. I can empathise with the negative feelings generated by a personal attack but is it not encumbent on us to see ALL the evidence from both sides and to evalute the accusers/critisizers based on what they actually said rather than what amounts to hearsay. This is not a crisism of Holly or her right to air her views on her own weblog just a call for level headed support of Holly for her many useful and welcome acts of paying forward. Let use take the moral highground.

  • sebastiene Sep 8, 2006 @ 11:30

    One other thing: musician Thomas Dolby had one big hit in the 80’s with “She Blinded Me With Science.”

    A man went up Thomas Dolby and called him a “one-hit-wonder.”

    Mr. Dolby replied, “It’s more than you’ve done, buddy.” 😉

    The people criticizing you are… who??? Go, Holly!!!!

  • sebastiene Sep 8, 2006 @ 11:14

    I won’t learn anything, I won’t grow or improve my writing, by ripping someone down. The people you ran across online haven’t learned that, yet. I’m working on my novel, today. (You probably are, too.) They’re wasting their time creating (and learning) nothing.

    I don’t like all of the James Patterson or Stephen King books, but there’s something there I can learn from. If a writer is making happy readers (which is what I want to do), then that writer must be doing something right. If I look for what successful writers (like you) are doing *right,* then I might learn something.

    And, if you created everything you’ve done using beginner workshops, then they must have been incredible! You don’t need a master class! You leave them in the dust.

  • Bettye Sep 8, 2006 @ 11:02

    Ahh yes. It isn’t just writers who suffer from these sorts of blowhards.
    I have to confess even after five decades of experience I’m still a bit shocked when someone undertakes a scathing critism of someone and their work without having actually spent time studying it.
    When I find someone who does something well I try to encourage others to take note.
    If I find someone who is not a good example, role model, whatever I usually just don’t say anything about them. An exception is if I know someone trying to emulate them is in real danger of getting hurt, then I’ll suggest they consult someone else that I know will be trustworthy and helpful.
    Anytime someone asks me how to get started writing I recommend your site and materials first. I see no reason to confuse beginners whether we are teaching riding or writing.
    Bettye

  • Mari Sep 8, 2006 @ 7:59

    Holly–I normally greet people over on the Newcomers Board over on FM and a lot of them find us because of you. They appreciate the time and effort you put in on your site.

    I’ll never understand those that have to bash folks like you when all you did was try and help. I suggest ignoring them.

    Maripat

  • The English Rose Sep 8, 2006 @ 6:46

    Cheer up, Holly! They’re the minority. And besides, the people who like you search out your stuff. You have to go look for those people, eh? I feel very sorry for people that need to do that sort of thing. It points to a deeper problem within themselves, usually rooted in various things like the self-esteem and bigotry spectrum. It’s easy to say “don’t let it get to you,” but everybody knows it’s a lot harder to do something than to say it (in most cases.) So I propose, instead, to allow yourself the admitted discouragement people like that bring around, but recognize it for what it is – a response that anybody would have. Then recognize that since their criticisms have no basis in reality, they aren’t valid. It would be one thing if one of us who read your books and articles came screaming, “You ruined my budding career cuz I took your advice and you use too many adverbs!” or whatever. And again – for every one person who says that, there are at least two of us who appreciate your work a lot. I’m constantly coming back to the articles when I feel down on my writing, too. But that’s like anything in life – you can’t please all the people — and why should you? That would be boring. (Can you tell I’ve been rereading your articles on Theme and Voice?) 🙂

  • shay Sep 8, 2006 @ 4:18

    clearly they’re people who don’t have time to do anything decent with their lives.
    sure i think jelousy plays a part in each writer – we always want to be like someone else when our own writing is going the wrong way but to bash someone who generally helps people with what they’re trying to achieve?
    one word – morons

    From the ever supportive
    -Sally

  • Agyar Sep 8, 2006 @ 1:23

    Look at it this way: a lot of us are out here wishing we could get to where you are. We’d _love_ it (wouldn’t we?) if others found it worthwhile to vilify us and our writing.

    And…you’re helping us reach our goal. It’s noble work, really it is. Thanks!

    {8′>

    Btw–it’ll only get worse. I think you’re headed for the bestseller lists within the next book or two. _Then_ what will they say?

  • joela Sep 7, 2006 @ 21:40

    Jealousy. Envy. Idiots. That’s the words to describe those folks. Just write them into your novel as worm and have them eaten as they deserve.

  • Jim Sep 7, 2006 @ 21:40

    Holly,

    I guess we’ve known each other for almost fifteen years now, and been e-buddies for ten of those (CAN I convince you to come to a con in my area again soon? 🙂

    I had occasion last night to be wasting time, er digging about, in the wikipedia pages devoted to Harry Potter. Some attention was posed to Ms. Rowling’s critics, and most of the quoted criticism seemed to come down to the idea “her writing is popular, hence it must be .”

    This is the same criticism. People who can’t create — or won’t — and who thereby despise those who have bountiful imagination and creative energy, and use it productively to entertain, and entertainly inform, hundreds of thousands of people.

    I know this doesn’t feel good, but you have the talent and the strength and perservere. And I know you will, dear friend.

    Or, to quote another favorite author’s best character…

    “Honor is what you know about yourself.
    Reputation is what other people know about you. … So guard your honor. Let your reputation fall where it may. And outlive the bastards.”

    Jim

  • BJSteeves Sep 7, 2006 @ 21:15

    I can’t add anything else to what the others above have posted. I, for one, am very, very grateful for the help I have received from you.

    I have almost every book you have written, and I have enjoyed every one of them. I take whatever I can gleam from them, and apply that to my writing.

    I think you would be surprised at the loyal following you have. Ignore the idiots, they will just wear you down.

  • S William Shaw Sep 7, 2006 @ 20:14

    I have been reading your material for 2 years, and just recently started posting. If it wasn’t for you, I would have given up on writing. I know that sounds simplistic, but I have explored nearly endless writing sites, and always come back to your articles.

    Since a very young age I have always wanted to write a novel, and 2 years ago was about to quit. Your articles and information kept me going. This weekend I finished my first novel, and I can’t tell you how awesome it feels. (I’m sure you know how it feels)

    Whatever the dirtbags are saying, blow them off. The world generally has 2 types of people, “do-ers” and haters. Let the haters all join hands in their tight little circles of puss and vile and do what they do best, but do not let that stop you.

    As far as the Tolkien or D&D things goes, I am old enough to remember hatred for D&D because it stepped on sacred toes. The world doesn’t need more Hobbits and Gandalfs, it needs more worlds.

    Keep creating your worlds. And thanks from one of the long time lurkers who enjoys your wisdom and effort. Even if I never get published, my children and grandchildren will have a book that was passed down to them, all because this writer found your site and didn’t quit.

  • shawna Sep 7, 2006 @ 20:10

    Heck, I wouldn’t take parenting advice from most of the people I know that have kids, either! What their kids are like tell me I wouldn’t want to.

    But damn, the more of your (fantasy) writing I read, Holly, the more I want you to (have time to) hurry up and finish those worldbuilding clinics, because 1) I already know you can teach, and 2) I want to learn how to do THAT. Or at least as much can rub off on me. I’m that fascinated.

    There simply aren’t any references out there like your Language clinic, and if any approaching what you intend for the Culture and World clinics exist, I haven’t found hide nor hair of them… and I’ve looked.

    Back to the kids reference… I’ve been through hell to get to where I am to have the confidence in myself and what I’m doing with my kids… and I have good kids. And I know it. What I’m doing works.

    When someone tries to tell me some particular movie won’t hurt, or letting them get away with this or that won’t matter, I can just let it pass… because I know better. I see what my children are like, and what theirs are like, and I know who’ll come out best in the end. I don’t need to prove it. They can dis me all they want— but I have the best deal in the end— and am comfortable now and later that I’m doing things right. And to top it off— I get to enjoy my kids, not be irritated by them. I’m already winning. Some people are just too wrapped up in their attitudes to notice.

    And now I have two rats on my shoulder, and so lost the rest of what I was going to say, except that we know you’re good, you know you’re good, and probably somewhere inside, they’re just jealous… I suppose you could always think, as I do about the kid-advice thing, something along the lines of yeah, yeah, whatever, go jump off a cliff… and proceed merrily along my OWN business…

    but then, I never did make a very good follower anyways. Prefer it that way.

    Sorry to get so distracted, but the kid dumping a pair of rats on my shoulder will do that to me.

  • pugh7755 Sep 7, 2006 @ 20:08

    I would treat everyone who has anything to say about you like apples. Those of us who adore you and what you have done for us, pick us up off the orchard ground to make fine cider and pies, and leave the rest to rot like the fertilizer they are.

  • Gabriele Sep 7, 2006 @ 19:36

    Yep, you should write cumbersome prose rich with big words everyone has to look up, and have your characters angst a lot (a plus for incest), and never, ever add some action to the inexistant plot. Action is so prosaic, you know. As is plot.

    And Heaven, or Walhalla, forbid writing should be easy and fun (on some days) and assignments could be done in five minutes. If it doesn’t take ten years, two suicide attempts, a broken family and drug dependency, it’s not writing, it’s jutting words down. Also, how dare you write several thousands words on some days? More than five is too much. And these you’ll have to edit the next day until they are the perfect five words. Big ones everyone has to look up.

    *tongue firmly in cheek, of course*

  • NoelFigart Sep 7, 2006 @ 19:32

    “The dogs bark but the caravan marches on.”

    I will say that for myself, I don’t take writing advice from someone who is not where I want to be — earning a living at it!

    I don’t take parenting advice from people who don’t have kids, either.

  • SLHouse Sep 7, 2006 @ 18:40

    Lets see…you have free workshops and advice for beginning writers on your site. When you probably could charge for it. Your a very talented writer who takes alot of time to put in very informative and useful pod casts. And you have a great blog for us to read a little about yourself. Gee, your so loathsome.
    Sharon

  • CT Sep 7, 2006 @ 17:17

    “But God save us all from the fucking experts.”

    Heh. Think I’ll make that my personal motto.

  • hollylisle Sep 7, 2006 @ 16:58

    I apologize for the glumness. I’ve watched folks like these wreak havoc on the confidence of friends and colleagues for years, and I’d be lying if I suggested that I was immune from their poison.

    It isn’t anything that can be fixed, either.

    Neither you nor I nor Odin and his raven could go in and suggest to folks like these that perhaps…um…knowing what they’re talking about might be a good idea before they opened their mouths. There was a professional critic once (granted, he worked for an embarrassment of a paper, but he was a pro), who trashed my writing in the private SFWA discussion without having actually read any of it. When confronted, he admitted that he hadn’t read any of it. He wouldn’t lower himself to read such common stuff, you see—but he could certainly opine in ignorance and with the appearance of expertise.

    If professionals are no better than that, what hope do we have that amateurs might hold themselves to a higher standard.

    Some do. Many do, in fact. But God save us all from the fucking experts.

  • Bridget Sep 7, 2006 @ 16:50

    What the others said. I wish I had something to add, but it boils down to what they said.

    ((((((((((((((Holly))))))))))))))

  • BookLover Sep 7, 2006 @ 16:49

    I bought your workshops and use them as reference, workshop, and refresher course. I’m nearing the end of my first year as a writer, and your workshops are invaluable to me.

    I’m an active member at Forward Motion; thanks to your work in establishing it.

    I’ve read three of your non-fiction, and nine of your fiction works, with four more currently on order. (I read “Hunting the Corrigan’s Blood” a second time, while I waited for more Holly books to arrive. My husband borrowed The Secret Texts from me, and lost “Vengeance of Dragons”, so he just ordered another copy.)

    It is difficult to express how much your body of work — the fiction, the non-fiction, your blog, FM and Vision, mean to me. It is simply foundational for me as a writer.

    I’m distressed for you and with you, over the group you mentioned. To plumb the depths of human inanity is truly depressing. I can only hope that the futility of their efforts will eventually wear them down.

    Be well, Holly, and keep on writing.

  • Rick Sep 7, 2006 @ 16:24

    And in the process of doing that, please ignore some of my typos.

  • Rick Sep 7, 2006 @ 16:23

    I like to think they’re balance out, though, by people like me, who have never met you but hold you in nothing but the highest regard. I’ve been following your blog and using FM and taking your advice and benefitting from all the hard work you’ve done since I was 14, Holly. I’m almost 20 now. You’ve had a damned large impact on my most formative years, and I have nothing but gratitude. So ignore the bitter pissants who wouldn’t know a good thing or a competent writer if it bit them in the cojones, and listen to the opinions of the people who matter – the people you’ve touched.

  • arrvee Sep 7, 2006 @ 14:42

    Those people can be a very positive force in your favor. If you weren’t doing something right, something that menaces their ideas about the shiniy, perfect world, they wouldn’t be upset. The thing to do is to keep on doing what you’re doing so well — selling novels, writing and selling non-fiction books for writers, publishing USEFUL workshops and articles. When they STOP complaining, you have a real problem.

  • JaCop Sep 7, 2006 @ 14:42

    When you stumble across such cretins, recall that for each one of them: there are TWO of us who appreciate the help you give and and adore your writing.

    Idiots are like potholes in NYC – no way to avoid them. A little jarring for a moment, yes . . . but hardly worth noticing once you move past them.

    Later!

  • TinaK Sep 7, 2006 @ 14:16

    People like that confuse me. If you are going to take the time to bitch or complain about someone or something, please take the time to actually read, review or use the material you are going to tear to shreds. I’ve got no problem with honest opinions but people who spout off because of jealously and ignorance? Next please…

  • Monica Sep 7, 2006 @ 14:11

    They are jealous jerkwad cretins! You’ve done more in a few years than they can dream of doing in a lifetime, so agog with envy, all they can do is bitch. Jealous!

    If one had time, it would be fun to go and make fun of them, but alas, time is a precious resource used by people who do things and produce results, like you do.

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