A Story In Pictures

Today is my day off. Back-to-back-to-back 70+ hour weeks getting the HTTS Walkthrough ready, working with Margaret on the NovelWritingSchool.com setup…

I was pretty ragged.

But I woke up late today, and knew where the next part of my ghost story had to go.

And I got 1832 words, and a complete scene plus change, and revamped the last bit of my outline, tossing one plot card and rewriting the other two.

The story is about an artist-turned-photographer in love with a singer-songwriter who got her first big break, then disappeared three years ago, while on tour.

The way the concept for the story came to me was in a series of sketches and photographs that appeared in my mind’s eye. They didn’t seem to have anything to do with each other.

  • A young woman on a picnic blanket.
  • A young woman on a record cover, back to the viewer and guitar in hand.
  • A girl crying in the rain.
  • A girl on a bus.

 

I tossed the crying-in-the-rain image today, when I figured out that a strip of those photo-booth pictures you get in malls would work better.

And the story is fascinating me in the manner that it comes together. My main character, the hero, picks up a picture on the back of which the heroine has scrawled a note, steps back in time to when the picture happened, and then steps forward in time to the present moment, and the clue his lost love has left him. (No actual time travel is involved—I just do his memories as if they were happening at that moment.)

I haven’t tried this method of presenting a story before, and while I love the way it’s coming together, I may be in for a hefty revision when I go back and read through it once I finish it.

I’m three scenes from done, though—wordcount-wise, more than halfway home. I have 4531 total, the agreement calls for 6500 or more, and I suspect I’m going to run pretty close to 8000.

That’s me.

What about you?

By the way, if you’re playing Write A Book With Me, you’ll see that the game has its own dropdown link in the top menu now. I figure this will make it easier for everyone to find the most recent post.

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About the author: Novelist, writing teacher, on a mission to reprint my out-of-print books and self-publish my new ones.

6 comments… add one
  • Hanna Apr 18, 2011 @ 7:05

    Finally. I guess I misunderstood and thought WABWM was going back to the Talysmana link.
    Also, Holly, you might want to check the hover action on the dropdowns. From the home page, it only drops down on hover for Writing Tips and Author.

  • Prue Apr 17, 2011 @ 10:25

    Dealing with sick husband and sick self (bronchitis). My characters for the HTRYN project have melted away but I’ve managed to do lesson 1 of HTTS. It’s one awesome lesson! This is the second time I’ve done it – I like the new worksheet for the Walkthrough which I found very useful.

  • Theresa Leschmann Apr 17, 2011 @ 9:41

    Just getting started with this. I love that you shared he inspiration for your story. I have several books in mind and will take a few days to decide which one I am going to pursue. Thanks for doing this. And for letting me play.

  • Teri Apr 17, 2011 @ 9:08

    121 words for the 16th, making twice in 5 days that I’ve written more than 100 words in a day. And hopefully I’ll be able to get back to HTRYN soon as well.

  • Linda Adams Apr 16, 2011 @ 20:56

    After a couple of setbacks involving a bug in Scrivener for Windows–wrote 500 words, and it didn’t save anything!–I did 402 words for my HTRYN book. This brings me to the 13K milestone. I’ve also come up with an interesting way for the character’s magic system to work (which works differently from the other characters)–a form of visualization, feeling, texture, and metaphor.

  • Felicia Fredlund Apr 16, 2011 @ 19:22

    I did the character module for lesson seven in HTTS today. I finished my three main characters with surprises from both the antagonist (he has a daughter! :O) and the protagonist’s sister (now I know why she insisted she was supposed to be in the story).

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