HomeFiction3 Questions for My Readers (and the story behind why I’m asking)

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3 Questions for My Readers (and the story behind why I’m asking) — 8 Comments

  1. I hope this is of some help:

    1) What do you specifically love about what you find in my fiction, and why — and what genre(s) would you call the parts you like?

    A1) I would classify your Cadence Drake novels as science fiction with some horror mixed in.

    Your other novels such as your Secret Texts and World Gates series I would classify as fantasy, with a mix of some horror. The Korre novels are also fantasy, horror and erotic too.

    All your novels have some romance in them, as in life, characters have feelings which brings the characters alive.

    My favorite reads are, and always has been, science fiction and fantasy. I also like good horror too.

    2) What do you try to avoid in my fiction, and why — and what genre(s) would you call the parts you avoid?

    A2) I love all you novels. I tend to shy away from the romance stories. But if I had to label parts of your novel, the romance parts are my least favorite. I am still on the fence on the erotic parts.

    3) What ONE other writer do you read who gives you what you love most about my fiction without giving you what you try to avoid in my fiction? (With a link to your favorite book by that reader if you’re willing to recommend him or her.)

    A3) For “pure” science fiction, almost any of Asimov’s Foundation series and Robot novels. For fantasy, Tolkien’s Lord of the Ring series. Horror, Stephen King’s Christine.

  2. I can’t answer your questions as specifically as you’d like, as it’s been many many years since I’ve read your books. I do, however, have a comment reading your books and horror:

    As a Young Adult / Teen reader many years ago, the place where I found horror in your books were in the beginning chapter(chapters?) of Bones of the Past. The trees still stick out in my mind as being well and truly supernaturally scary. Maybe by the time I had read Hunting the Corrigan’s Blood, I’d got over that – or maybe the vampires in space genre-bending just weirded me out more at the time than the set dressing.

  3. What do you specifically love about what you find in my fiction, and why — and what genre(s) would you call the parts you like?

    I love the worldbuilding in your story. I still remember how much I loved Diplomacy of Wolves. And Vincalis the Agitator I remember waiting for the local bookstore to get this book in. I think I was always drawn to your fantasy and your magic systems.

    What do you try to avoid in my fiction, and why — and what genre(s) would you call the parts you avoid?

    I haven’t read any of your SF yet, because I started with your fantasy ones and just barely in the last few years started reading SF.

    What ONE other writer do you read who gives you what you love most about my fiction without giving you what you try to avoid in my fiction? (With a link to your favorite book by that reader if you’re willing to recommend him or her.)

    Tamora Peirce: All her books. I do love fantasy.

    The Cainsville Series Kelley Armstrong I was very surprised with this series its very light urban fantasy mystery.

    Mercy Thompson books by Patricia Briggs It’s a great Urban fantasy with a really fun world building.

    Charley Davidson Book by Darynda Jones are also a great urban fantasy, with really fun world building.

    What’s drawn me to SF now is the Red Rising series by Pierce Brown – I sadly wasn’t too interested in book four of the series, but one through three are great.

    I hope I answered the questions right!

    • You cannot answer them wrong. Everything you put in front of me gives me a different perspective on what I write, and lets me explore possible directions I can take with the existing books, and with future work.

      Thank you so much.

  4. Hi Holly! That’s a really interesting blog post, and something I had not considered; thank you for sharing. Here are my off-the-cuff answers:

    1) What do you specifically love about what you find in my fiction, and why — and what genre(s) would you call the parts you like?

    I hadn’t considered that your writing might be horror either; to me, it’s always read as sci-fi or fantasy depending on the series. Sometimes it gets dark, yes, and sometimes it’s scary, but it’s not what I would call horror. The thing I love most about your fiction is that your writing has a very specific flavor to it, because of the way you blend fantasy/sci-fi with elements of reality. There are all these interesting fantastical ideas flying around, but the way the people behave and the way the worldbuilding works it all feels… grounded? Solid? There’s a heft to it that makes it plausible to me on a level so deep it’s only semi-conscious – it feels real, probably for the reasons you outlined in your reply above. In short, I’m pretty sure that what I love about it is exactly what caused that other reader to call it horror. Hah, oh well!

    2) What do you try to avoid in my fiction, and why — and what genre(s) would you call the parts you avoid?

    Can’t speak to your romance writing, but I don’t really avoid any parts of your sci-fi/fantasy fiction. I always tense up a little when an author starts tackling gender identity, because I have trans friends and [gestures at the state of the world] these days I’m primed to be sharply wary of the ways people handle that topic in their defense, so that is the only topic I might have been at risk of avoiding, but the way you handled it in Longview let me wind back down / reassured me that I don’t have to worry so much or feel the need to avoid it going forward. That’s been nice.

    3) What ONE other writer do you read who gives you what you love most about my fiction without giving you what you try to avoid in my fiction? (With a link to your favorite book by that reader if you’re willing to recommend him or her.)

    N/A – once upon a time I might have said Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson, but the blend of fantasy-and-realism in that isn’t the same flavor as yours, and the rest of his books are further off. While other authors adjust their fantasy-realism blends in ways I enjoy, I can’t think of any authors offhand who have a particularly similar feel to yours. Your writing is distinctive.

    Hope this helps!

    • This was tremendously helpful — and I’m very glad the gender stuff worked for you. It’s an area that matters a lot to me. Don’t want to make it the point of the stories, but do want to show a universe in which folks of all genders, races, and philosophies actually work together toward the world they all want to save.

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