2000+ on Cady Today

Fast words, happy writing, interesting twist in the story as she agrees to go looking for a fiance who went missing in curious territory.

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About the author: Novelist, writing teacher, on a mission to reprint my out-of-print books and self-publish my new ones.

6 comments… add one
  • The English Rose Mar 1, 2006 @ 8:35

    Interestingly, that’s the same article as the one I mean, but NOT the same writer. I found it with an author creditted at a different website, the man clearly claiming to have authored it. But the blurb I quoted I saw somewhere else (not the link you just posted). It must have been limyaael, then; thanks Holly, saved me having to painstakingly reread all your articles (not that I don’t generally do that, but you know…)

  • hollylisle Mar 1, 2006 @ 7:01

    From the article linked, I’d guess it was purpose-written by someone at the school. The author should be credited and have a copyright notice on the piece, but since it’s only at its original location when it was searched, I’m guessing plagiarism hasn’t been a problem so far.

  • hollylisle Mar 1, 2006 @ 6:58

    Rose — That wasn’t me. 😀

  • kalbzayn Feb 28, 2006 @ 16:37

    I remember that article, too and just did a quick Google search and the only place link I found was this:

    http://www.orangeusd.k12.ca.us/yorba/elements_of_a_story.htm

    I don’t see any credits, though, or any other hits for it on Google.

    I thought I had originally read it here, too, though. I really dig that article.

  • The English Rose Feb 28, 2006 @ 14:23

    Holly, this may be random, but I’m reading an article and happened across the lines:

    “Develop the plot as a series of increasingly serious problems. (The heroine escapes the villain in Chapter 5 by fleeing into the snowy mountains; now in Chapter 6 she risks death in an avalanche.) Establish suspense by making solution of the problems uncertain (How will the heroine escape the avalanche and avoid freezing to death in Chapter Seven?).

    Make solutions of the problems appropriate to the characters (Good thing she took Outward Bound training in Chapter One).”

    I KNOW that I’ve seen that before in an article by either you or limyaael. I’ve scanned yours and hers and I can’t remember where it was or which of you wrote it. Was it you (if you can recall)?

  • kalbzayn Feb 28, 2006 @ 12:05

    Congrats.

    Last night, I was actually trying to work on a story and was having all kinds of trouble with a character that I needed to do something, bit wasn’t very excited about keeping him around.

    So I killed him after he carried out his task. Very neat. The deed is done, he’s no longer a problem, and now I have a mystery to throw into one of the side plots.

    The reason I’m mentioning it is because I think I remember reading one of your articles where you recommended doing something similar if a character was giving you problems.

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