Interview with Stephanie Osborn, author of The Case Of The Displaced Detective (science fiction)
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The Case of the Displaced Detective: Book 1

The Case of the Displaced Detective: Book 1

  1. In a single sentence of thirty words or less, describe your main story, hero, conflict, and why my readers will love your book.

    Physicist Dr. Skye Chadwick discovers an alternate reality wherein Sherlock Holmes is destined to die at Reichenbach and rescues him, but can Holmes thrive – even survive – in our modern world?

  2. What is the core of this story, your passion for writing it, the reason you wrote THIS book and not something else?

    This is a fish-out-of-water story. I wanted to take one of the most brilliant men in literature and place him in a situation where he had only two choices – lose his mind, or man up and adapt.

    Grow.

    Learn.

    I’ve been a “Holmesian” since childhood, so he was the logical choice. And once the “plot-bunny” bit, I couldn’t NOT write it. 215,000 words spilled out of me in two months. Which is why it’s a two-volume: The Arrival, and At Speed. The Arrival is an “origin story,” with foreshadowings of a spy ring after the project that brought Holmes here, and by its end we go full bore into the mystery, which unwinds fully in At Speed.

  3. The Case of the Displaced Detective: Book 2

    The Case of the Displaced Detective: Book 2

  4. Which character do you most love, and why?

    I adore Holmes, always have, always will. He’s so brilliant, and so very human, at the same time. I wish he WAS real.

  5. What was the most difficult part of writing this book, and why?

    Keeping Holmes true to himself as Doyle created him, hands down. Holmes’ character and quirks are fixed. And here I was, putting him in a situation that would stretch his very reason to its limits – imagine being jerked from your own world, leaving everything and everyone you have ever known and loved behind, and transmitted 150 years into the future! And yet I still had to maintain the essential Holmes.

  6. If you were to pick a quote from the book to represent you, your writing, and what readers should expect from you, what would it be?

    “Everyone please stand behind the yellow line until the doors open. No food, drink, flash photography, or video cameras are permitted. Once aboard the ride, please keep your hands and arms inside the vehicle at all times until we come to a full and complete stop. Otherwise, they’re apt to end up in another universe somewhere without ya, and wouldn’t that fry your noggin?”
    —Skye Chadwick, The Case of the Displaced Detective: The Arrival

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Comments

Interview with Stephanie Osborn, author of The Case Of The Displaced Detective (science fiction) — 5 Comments

  1. Pingback: Sullivan Maxx Literary Agency » Blog Archive » Stephanie Osborn in three FANTASTIC links!

  2. Sorry this post is in relation to your newsletter you just sent out about some woman who sent you an email about not using the word hell?
    I could find nowhere else to comment on it, so I’m doing it here.
    No, honestly. She had to have been joking!
    When I read it, that’s how I interpreted it. She could not have possibly been for real!
    Could she???
    Are you sure it was not a joke?

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