About Holly

Novelist, writing teacher, on a mission to reprint my out-of-print books and self-publish my new ones.

“Write A Series” Students: What you’ll need BEFORE we start the Expansion
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I’m still putting together How To Write A Series Module 1: Creating Series Setup through Completion of Story One, but I solved the “how to present it” issue, and my goal getting this module up and making it available is next week.

So let’s talk about prepping for the class.

In the first four lessons of How To Write A Series, you get the detailed instructions on how to determine the sort of series you want to write, and how to put it together, how to make the beginnings compelling, the middles tight, and the endings moving and memorable.

 

THE EXPANSION IS DIFFERENT…

In the Expansion, we’re going to be writing our series.

The first group through this course will be getting what is essentially a very large, extended, live workshop. I’m going to be writing my series. You’re going to be writing your series. We are all going to be pushing deadlines.

 

TIME TO GET YOUR DUCKS IN A ROW

The HTWAS Expansion is not a read now, do later course. So you need to do some prep work.

Because of time frames involved, for this class plan on writing a SHORT STORY series, with story lengths between 10,000 and 20,000 words apiece. Figure out how much story you can write, revise, and EDIT in one month, and set that as your story word count.

From HTWAS Lesson 1, know what KIND of series you want to write: Bullet-proof Cast in Inconsequential Time with Linked Sequential Stories in Small World…

Loner in Unchanging Time in Big World with Loosely Connected Stand-Alones…

Or any of the other types.

In case you were wondering, I’m doing a Fair-Game Cast, Consequential Time, Linked Sequential Series in a Universe/Multiverse. (With a neat twist on the Multiverse.)

Know what GENRE you want to write in.

Mine is Space Opera.

But I’m covering every genre you want to know. Your questions in each module will inform the genres and presentation of the next module, as we did with the first run of How To Think Sideways, and How To Revise Your Novel.

We’ll develop series ideas IN CLASS, using the Octopus Sweet Spot Map and the Series Matrix, so you don’t need an idea. You just need to know your framework.

 

QUICK REMINDER if you’re on the fence…

This is final week that the course will be available at its current price.

Students who buy now at the current price receive ALL six modules at no extra cost. This is a savings of $150.

If you don’t have the course yet, you can get it now for the old price and be caught up with the live Expansion about the time Module 2 goes live.

When Module 1 goes live, the price goes up $25 to reflect that addition. Each additional module will be an additional $25. Modules are NOT sold separately.

If you don’t have the course yet but you’re interested, How To Write A Series is here:

http://howtothinksideways.com/shop/how-to-write-a-series-master-the-art-of-sequential-fiction/  (Opens in new tab)

 

And a P.S.:

All students who purchased the FULL version of How To Write A Series have already purchased the upgrade. Make sure the course opens for you in the link from your Classroom Hub.

Students who have the free HTWAS bonus version of the class included with How To Revise Your Novel DO NOT HAVE the upgrade.

If you’re an HTRYN student and you want the HTWAS Expansion, use the Big Courses Discount shop in your HTRYN sidebar menu to get before I take the first module live. Discount Shop prices will be going up for this course too.

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Enter The Death Circus: Tales from THE LONGVIEW, Episode 1
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Death Circus Cover-ebook-FLAT-200x300In Tales From The Longview, travel to the far reaches of Settled Space, where slavery is franchised, where people are required to volunteer for their own death sentences, and where powerful governments license out the right to kill to the highest bidders.

Enter a crew of determined survivors from the worlds that tried to destroy them, guided by a mysterious recluse bent on turning the system against itself and freeing the worlds his spaceship encounters.

Set in the Settled Space universe, this series fits between the end of WARPAINT and the beginning of THE WISHBONE CONSPIRACY.

THE FREEBIES

Enter The Death Circus — CHAPTER 1

This Criminal

DOWN THE DARKNESS, down the line of standing cells, three words rippled urgently and under breath. “Death Circus here!”
In the dark, this criminal had waited long and longer for death to come. This criminal could not lie down, could not sit down—its captors had made certain its cell, and the cells of the others like it, permitted only standing.

With its bandaged knees pressed into one corner, its spine jammed into the other, this criminal drifted in that lightless place, never certain whether it was waking or dreaming. When it ate, it ate maggots. When it dreamed of eating, it dreamed of maggots. When it pissed or shit, it pissed or shit down its legs. When it dreamed, it dreamed of the same.

In one thing only this criminal knew a dream was a dream, and that was when it touched We-42K again, or saw its wondrous smile.

That could only be a dream, for We-Above had taken this criminal out of its cell to watch beautiful We-42K volunteer its death and the death of the unlicensed-but-born that We-42K and this criminal had made. We-42K had stood above the flames of Return to Citizenship with the born in its arms, and had turned to smile at this criminal. It looked thin and starved and filthy standing there, and the born looked dead, and as if it had been dead for a while.

The born had been beautiful when this criminal had first seen it, when this criminal and We-42K had hidden in the hills and held each other at night, had accidentally made the born, had brought it into the world together. The born had the bright red hair of We-42k, and eyes that looked at this criminal with strange knowing—and this criminal had thought for a little while that life could hold more than work and duty.

That ended, and after the end, the capture, the sentencing, the imprisonment, this criminal watched the flames and knew that the We are right to say Only Death Forgives.

This criminal has no right of judgement, but this criminal will never forgive.

The We asked this criminal if it would volunteer for redemption as We-42K had done. This criminal spit in the face of We. It refused forgiveness and Return to Citizenship—though it cannot say why—and thus it has been judged Willful, and sentenced to Death Without Citizenship, Redemption, or Merit.

And now that death has come.

“Death Circus here!” this criminal whispers down the line.
The metal doors bang open, and light trickles down the corridor. This criminal hears the first cells at the front opening, and the thwack of the prod on naked flesh, a sound this criminal knows well, a touch it feels often.

“We offer last chance to volunteer for Return to Citizenship. Will the nameless willful thing repent?”

“It will not,” the Willful at the head of the corridor rasps. This criminal thinks it recognizes that voice, unheard above a whisper before now, and it is encouraged. It puts a face to the voice and sees another like itself, another that once thought life might be made better. That Willful held strong. This criminal will be able to hold strong too, will be able to face the unknown death rather than accept the known one.

Both We say, “Then it goes to the Death Circus now.”

This criminal cannot say why the Death Circus seems better than the Return to Citizenship, with its quick leap into the lake of fire.
But an unknown, unvolunteered death is a better death. This criminal has had little more to think about than that question since the immolation of We-42K and the born.

The cells open and close, the Willful, the Blasphemers, and the Infidels make their choices to volunteer death or to take death by force, and at last this criminal’s cell opens, and the We stand there and drag it out into the corridor and say, “We offer last chance to volunteer for Return to Citizenship. Will the nameless willful thing repent?”

This criminal spits into the face of the guard that asks, and takes its beating, and is surprised that the beating is so light.
Then it remembers that the Death Circus buys its creatures, and that it once heard whispers of guards sentenced for Willfulness for damaging criminals so badly the Death Circus refused to pay the Tithe to the We to acquire them.

Inside, this criminal laughs just a little, and tries to work up enough fluid to spit into the face of the other guard.


Kagen

KAGEN, SITTING IN THE Verimeter desk beneath the flapping cloth of the red-and-black Death Circus tent, muttered, “I hate this filthy little moon.”

Burke looked over at him and raised an eyebrow. Burke would be doing disease screening—testing blood and saliva—on every criminal offered to the Death Circus, which meant he had to get within arm’s reach of the strange mixture of people sentenced to death by the owners of Fair Bluff. The town was regional center for the half-dozen settlements on The People’s Home of Truth and Fairness 14-B, so it was the contact point for all Death Circuses.

“Why do you hate this moon? It looks normal enough to me.”
Burke was new. Provisional Crew Three. If he could get through this screening without going to pieces, he would be permitted to take the final portion of the Provisional Crew Three entrance exam and he’d earn a paid place at the bottom rung of the Longview’s crew, as Three Green.

Kagen had been Crew Three for just under four years, and in that time had pushed through four promotions to reach Crew Three Gold. He held the record for fastest time and most grades skipped to reach Three Gold.

He’d already taken his Crew Two entry levels. Had already achieved all of his promotion points to reach Crew Two. He had his future planned, his goal set.

He hadn’t received word that he’d passed the exam, yet, but if he had—and if he could rise to Crew Two, it meant more than just the possibility of a bigger, quieter room away from the engine noise to him. It meant better pay—he’d save every extra rucet, just as he’d saved everything he’d made in the last few years.

And it meant keeping The Dream alive. There were no accelerated promotions in Crew Two, but he was sure he could still make an impression. He had to make an impression.

There were rumors of a promotion at the top. Unsubstantiated, but plausible.

Had been for weeks, which was what had pushed him to take the Crew Two entry levels. He wanted to be ready when opportunity arose.

Burke, Kagen thought, looked to be a slow riser. The man had only cursory interest in what he was doing. To Kagen he seemed flat and bland and far too slow. Kagen suspected Burke hadn’t hurt enough to see the opportunity provided by the Longview, that he wasn’t hungry enough to ever rise past the automatic promotions in Crew Three.
Kagen, though, had been hungry all his life.

“If there is such a thing as pure evil, it lives here,” Kagen muttered.

Burke said, “How is this worse than any other Pact world?”

Kagen looked around the still-empty tent and said, “This is a PHTF franchise. If you have thirty million rucets and want to be a god, you too can own a People’s Home of Truth and Fairness settlement on your own little moon. There are a couple hundred of them now, I think, and they all run on the same rules. I come from PHTF-36. I still have nightmares.” And he laughed.

To show that he was over it.

Burke glanced over at him with an expression Kagen saw as bovine curiosity. “How did you get out?”

“The We sentenced me to exile in the Needle, with the reminder that I could jump at any time and be forgiven for my crime.”

“You were a Mule?”

Kagen forced a grin. “Indeed. I kissed a girl, and gave her a nickname. My Sentence was Willful and Blasphemer, but I hadn’t done quite enough for the Speakers for We to put me in prison. Being a Mule exiled in the Needle is supposed to be the same outcome as if you’re sentenced to death… but because of the Longview, you know how that is.” Kagen tipped his head up to the invisible point of the Needle, where the Longview was currently docked. “Since I didn’t end up dying for my crime, it was worth it.”

Burke nodded. “The secret rooms.”

The rooms in the Needles were only secret to those who despised the technology that created them and the men they’d had to hire to build them. All Needles required someone to work in the top, to greet the spaceships making their rounds through their routes, to accept or reject docking.

The PHTF worlds chose to send lone criminals into exile in the Needles. Those they didn’t deem valuable enough to sell to the visiting Death Circuses, anyway.

Which was what brought Kagen to this world he despised so much. Kagen, Burke, and the rest of the ground team from the Longview were set up to start screening candidates for purchase by the Death Circus.
The We were supposed to have had their criminals in front of the tent an hour ago, but as usual they’d managed to get a string of last-minute conversions from the ranks of the criminals sentenced to death, and the We of the People’s Home of Truth and Fairness 14-B were busy burning them—or rather, having the criminals burn themselves—out back of the tent in their nasty little lake of fire.

Every PHTF world had a lake of fire, and they all looked the same. Kagen suspected it was part of the franchise.

Kagen could hear the announcement of the crimes of the volunteers: Willfulness, Blasphemy, Infidelity, over and over. Could hear the screams as the sentenced threw themselves into the flames rather than meet their fate with the Death Circus. Charlie, who was not a member of the crew but a mandatory passenger, was doing her duty in her role as official Pact Covenant observer. She was out in back testing all the volunteers to make sure none had been drugged, and that none were forced to jump into the lake.

Because she had gone renegade, Charlie would also watch for, and enforce removal of, anyone who gave any sign whatsoever of having second thoughts.

Nineteen out of every twenty prisoners on a PHTF world would fling themselves into the lake of fire and die in agony rather than allow themselves to be purchased by a Death Circus.

So the smell of burning human flesh was strong in the tent, and the intermittent sounds of screaming were loud. Equally horrible was the cheering of the throng of observers pulled from their work and made to chant, “You’re forgiven! Welcome home!” as each volunteer stopped screaming.

For an instant, Kagen was back among them. Pressed up against the fence, feeling the stares of the Speakers for We focused on him and the others with him, he cheered and screamed with the rest as the pretty young woman, sentenced for the crimes of Property of Beauty and Apart of Love, threw herself into the fire. Kagen had not been the only boy who had kept his face forward so the guards could not see the tears streaming down his cheeks as he watched her die.

Not cheering was a sign of being Apart. Everyone cheered, because Speakers for We would note those who did not, and would investigate them for other crimes.

Each did what All did, or Each found itself locked away beneath the earth, or burning in the lake of Return to Citizenship.
He shuddered and was back in the the red-and-black tent, back in someone else’s horrible little world.

At last the We ran out of volunteers, and the sound of marching feet approached the tent flap of the Death Circus. Those prisoners ineligible for volunteering to repent—the murderers, rapists, pedophiles, and thieves—would come in first. They were Pact World Class A prisoners, meaning their sentencing and treatment fell within the Pact World Convention guidelines. They would be clean, well fed, well rested, and clothed, because if they weren’t, The People’s Home of Truth and Fairness 14-B would lose its charter, and with it the steady infusion of licensed charter world grant money from the Pact Worlds Equalization of Opportunity Committee that kept it alive. Once the Class A prisoners had been tested for diseases, Verilized, and categorized by health to determine the price the Death Circus had to pay for them, they would present their paperwork to the Death Circus judge, who would decide whether they were guilty or innocent—and would then determine whether they would be taken aboard the Longview, or left behind.

The Longview had to accept and purchase at least 33% Class A prisoners from those prisoners presented by the worlds it serviced in order to keep its Death Circus license.

Class B prisoners were sentenced under local jurisdiction, for anything considered a crime on that world, but not necessarily held to be a crime elsewhere. Because they were still covered by the Pact World Covenants, which ruled that no member world could carry out a death sentence, they could not be executed.

But the Pact World Covenants charter for Death Circuses was that any prisoner taken aboard a Death Circus ship must have a death sentence carried out, but only outside the Pact World borders.

It was up to the discretion of ship owners and ship captains on how these sentences would be carried out, but they had to be carried out, because each world that handed over a prisoner to the Death Circus had a written guarantee that the prisoner would die in a timely and appropriate fashion.

Class B prisoners were almost always criminals of a political or religious nature. And they always arrived at the Death Circus barely breathing: starved, caked in their own excrement, covered in sores. The only rules for Pact World members regarding Class B prisoners was that they could not be allowed to die while imprisoned, and that they had to be able to walk to and through the Death Circus under their own power.

The Longview crew had additional rules. The owner of the Longview insisted that each Class B must be showered until clean and dressed in fresh, dry, disposable clothing before entering the Death Circus tent. Nor were the PHTF guards permitted to do the washing. Members of the Death Circus crew were to do it, gently and with good soap and soft towels.

Kagen suspected the owner, whom he had never met or even been permitted to discuss, had once been a Class B prisoner on a PHTF world—one who had escaped, and who had then vowed to somehow help those still trapped.

It was a romantic notion, and considering the vast expenses of running a Death Circus, and the equally vast profits to be made for running one well, it was probably a silly one.

Nevertheless, he held that possibility as his truth until proven wrong, and occasionally assigned himself to prisoner cleanup duty. It was good for his unit’s morale to see him do so, and it reminded him that, though he had escaped his PHTF home, many still remained.

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Edison and Me: How NOT to Do Something Difficult
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I have the information for the first module of How To Write A Series more or less finished.  The story is done and beautifully edited. NOT by me. I’m fighting myself over the damn cover art.

So far so good.

And today I spent six hours trying to figure out how to bring all of this information—and there is a lot of it, including some new techniques I came up with to make this whole Writing A Series Without Having It Fall Apart On You Three Books Down The Line process simpler… When I hit the weird and wacky wall of SOFTWARE. Of All things.

Started with Inspiration. Nope, that’s not gonna work. It’s missing presentation options I need.

Moved to ConceptDraw Mindmap. SO not going to work. It’s missing MOST of the options I need to get this done.

I spent that six hours learning two detailed course creation processes that won’t work for this course.

Edison spent a lot longer than that on the lightbulb, and a lot more tries, but unlike Edison, I’ve built courses before, and I thought going in that I knew exactly how to present this.

Now I’m looking at Keynote, and considering slides and downloads.

Or going my Ugly Workshop route with hand-drawn diagrams on quad paper.

Or… something else.

My objectives are to be concise and fast, to make sure I cover the material thoroughly but that I don’t overwhelm anyone with details, to make sure I make this as easy as possible for the writer to use, and to create a fun, entertaining, interesting course that allows writers to achieve success on their first use of the course, as well as with subsequent uses.

So. I’m struggling. I’m going spend a few hours this evening getting the rest of my background material and notes together.

And I’m promising myself one more time that this will NOT end up being as big a course as How To Think Sideways. Or even How To Revise Your Novel.

 

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Editor’s Revision DONE on LONGVIEW #1
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Okay. Took a while because I’ve rewritten the same two chapters three times.

But I got it. Had previously added two thousand words to the first revision, added three thousand more today.

And FINALLY I love what I got. The story will go to my copyeditor tomorrow, I’ll figure out in the meantime what sort of cover I want for the thing.

And meanwhile, I now have HTWAS Expansion Module 1 outlined. I’ll be working on that tomorrow.

I’m tremendously excited, both about the story, and about the course.

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LONGVIEW revision is done! Starting type-in.
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The series matrix worked well, I got an ending I’m much happier with, and revised all 60 pages yesterday and today.

So now I’ll do type-in, and hand the whole thing off to Matt for content editing when it’s done.

And then I’ll build out the rest of HTWAS Expansion Module 1.

Rather than beta the story, I’m trying out a pro editor for this.  If it works out, I’ll  do the rest of my short fiction this way.

Beta testing is way too useful for long fiction, though. So I’ll probably keep that step even if I decide to add this editor as my final pre-formatting step in getting my work out.

Will let you know how it goes.

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The first draft of The LONGVIEW I: Enter The Death Circus is done. (INCLUDES SNIPPET)
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Caught a good writing wind this morning at 6 AM, and just now finished the first draft of Enter the Death Circus, which is the first of six (or possibly seven) stories in The LONGVIEW series. I did 2,783 words today to get it finished.

And I’m pleased with what I got. I have to go through my series matrix to make sure I didn’t miss anything critical…and one of the main characters threw me a total shock this morning, and I’m going to have to run that through the matrix to see what sort of weird twists it adds.

Here’s a snippet—the story opener. (By the way, the story is told from several points of view).

From The Longview #1: Enter the Death Circus

NOTICE: This material is copyrighted, unchecked raw first draft, probably buggy. Please don’t post typos or corrections (I do my edits at the end of the first draft of the project and will not see your comments when I revise). This material may not survive to publication. Do not quote or repost anywhere or in any format. Thanks.

Down the darkness, down the line of standing cells, three words rippled urgently and under breath. “Death Circus here!”

In the dark, this criminal had waited long and longer for death to come. This criminal could not lie down, could not sit down—its captors had made certain its cell, and the cells of the others like it, permitted only standing.

With its bandaged knees pressed into one corner, its spine jammed into the other, this criminal drifted in that lightless place, never certain whether it was waking or dreaming. When it ate, it ate maggots. When it dreamed of eating, it dreamed of maggots.When it pissed or shit, it pissed or shit down its legs. When it dreamed, it dreamed of the same.

In one thing only, this criminal knew a dream was a dream, and that was when it touched We-42K again, or saw its wondrous smile.

That could only be a dream, for We-Above had taken this criminal out of its cell to watch beautiful We-42K volunteer its death and the death of the unlicensed-but-born that We-42K and this criminal had made. We-42K had stood above the flames of Return to Citizenship with the born in its arms, and had turned to smile at this criminal. It looked thin and starved and filthy standing there, and the born looked dead, and as if it had been dead for a while.

The born had been beautiful when this criminal had first seen it, when this criminal and We-42K had hidden in the hills and held each other at night, had accidentally made the born, had brought it into the world together. The born had the bright red hair of We-42k, and eyes that looked at this criminal with strange  knowing—and this criminal thought for a little while that life could hold more than work and duty.

That ended, and after the end, the capture, the sentencing, the imprisonment, this criminal watched the flames and knew that the We are right to say Only Death Forgives.

This criminal has no right of judgement, but this criminal will never forgive.

I want to do the revision and get the story live on Kindle KDP in the next week.

For writers, I’ll be building the first module of the How To Write A Series Expansion at the same time, though it probably won’t be finished at the same time.

I’ll announce here and via the HTTS Boot Camp Member list (login, then click Member Updates from the classroom hub and sign up) and the Writing Tips list the day before I take HTWAS Expansion: Module 1 live.

Quick reminder if you want the course…The price will go up by $25 when I add the first module, and by the same amount when I add each subsequent module.

You are grandfathered into ALL FUTURE MODULES at whatever point you buy the course. The current price is the best it will ever be.

 

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Self-Publishers: New numbers you need NOW
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I did that interview with Simon Whistler…

http://rockingselfpublishing.com/author/simon/ (link opens in new tab)

…that went live last Tuesday, and from doing that interview I bumped into Hugh Howey, and from doing that, I encountered an entire series of links to writers who have done the HARD math on self-publishing.

I’m only giving you two. There are many, but these two are CRITICAL if you’re a writer.

I have not done THIS math. I have never seen THIS math done before. I didn’t even know which questions to ask to get me to this math.

(Aside from deadline math, I suck at math.)

Fortunately, both Hugh Howey (the author of WOOL that I keep raving about) and Courtney Milan (whose work I have not yet read) are Good At Math.

And really, really good at explaining what the numbers mean, and why they matter to you, the writer.

Howey and Milan have done math on self publishing vs. commercial publishing. It is mind-blowing.

Go here to read Hugh Howey’s thing first:

Hugh has discovered the actual numbers of print books vs. ebooks in a limited but relevant sample, the numbers of these that are commercially pubbed, the number that are self-pubbed, has gotten a good idea of the size of the market, and is going to knock your
socks off.

http://authorearnings.com/the-report/ (link opens in new tab)

You’ll need what he’s discovered before you read Courtney Milan’s math, because with his dissection of the book publishing market and where self-publishing stands in it, you can the understand the absolutely mind-boggling importance of what Courtney Milan has discovered.

So now read Courtney Milan:

Courtney is going to show you what commercial publishing contracts are worth versus self-pubbing your own work over time. She, too, is going to knock your socks off. (Assuming you put them back on after reading Hugh.)

She’s also going to give you a downloadable spreadsheet so you can test things yourself.

http://www.courtneymilan.com/ramblings/2013/08/19/know-what-your-rights-are-worth/  (link opens in new tab)

What’s MY take-away on this?

I have printed these off. I have read them and re-read them, but I have not yet taken them apart piece by piece to work into my own publishing plan, or used Courtney’s spreadsheet so get the important view on what my personal sales numbers mean.

HOWEVER…

I was already done with commercial publishing. Now? Even that one book I was considering as my last connection to traditional publishing is off the table for anyone but me.

This is not THE happiest day of my life. But it’s up there.

What’s YOUR take-away on this?

If you read these two articles and go through them (with a math-savvy friend if necessary), at bare minimum you will understand the potential, revised-and-edited value of those unpublished books in your inventory—or the rights you’re considering selling to publishers.

Potentially, this is much more than that. Potentially, depending on what you decide to do with the knowledge you gain, this is the information you need to create the life you want to live for yourself.

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Started into The Longview, and the HTWAS Expansion
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I got 2058 words on the first story in Tales from the Longview, a planned 60,000-70,000 word series of 6 or 7 10,000-word stories set in my Settled Space universe, which is also the home of my Cadence Drake novels.

This was my original concept for the series:

After the development of the origami drive, Sleeper ships became useless…for a while. But old technologies can find their place in the future—with the right mission, and with an owner who can take the long view.

It’s a bit thin, but the Sentence for the first story is stronger:

A criminal sentenced to the Death Circus for daring to love discovers a second chance at life within his death.

So here’s going to be my process:

I’m going to write each of the six or seven stories first. I’m also going to self-pub each story separately, and then going to do an anthology of them when I’m done.

After I complete one story, I’ll put together the How To Write A Series Expansion module for that story. Then I’ll publish the story. Then write the next story. Then do the next module.

Students of the course will receive the multiple story drafts (I think of them as “dailies”) as part of their course.

After I have each module together, but before I’ll take it live, I’ll send out one last call to the folks on the How To Write A Series Expansion list, (which will also include lesson reminders and links), and will make sure that you get the best price on the course available.

If you’re interested, in the How To Write A Series Expansion, sign up here:






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I do a self-publishing interview: Podcast—Simon Whistler, Interviewer
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Simon Whistler and I discuss self-publishing, commercial publishing, ethical self-promotion, and a LOT of other information on getting your writing career up and running.

Simon has a great site and a long list of other interviews, a free course on building your own author website quickly, and much more:

http://rockingselfpublishing.com/episode-34-traditional-publishing-self-pub-holly-lisle/

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Down to the last bits on Create A World Clinic
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Yesterday I fixed all the typos and formatting errors my beta testers found.

Today I’m doing usability fixes: rebuilding worksheets that left my beta testers lost or confused, moving things around in the Geek-Deep Worldbuilding section to make it easier to understand how the included videos and worksheets connect to the whole Geek-Deep worldbuilding process…stuff like that.

Will take a few days to do this, and I will no doubt introduce a few mistakes that will NOT be caught, because I’m not doing another round of beta-ing.

I’m going live after I finish this.

Which means:

  • Formatting for PDF, Kindle, ePub, Print
  • Cover art
  • Production
  • Course and worksheet uploading and page setup
  • Early-Bird private purchase page link goes out
  • Take the course live on my site
  • Link to the HTTS Boot Camp Member World Clinic coupon goes out
    1. It’s not too late to get in on the HTTS Boot Camp World Clinic Members-Only Discount.
    2. If you don’t already have a free membership, create one here: https://howtothinksideways.com/create-your-free-general-membership-account/
    3. Make SURE you’re on the Boot Camp mailing list: http://howtothinksideways.com/classrooms/htts-boot-camp-member-updates/ Most of the time you’ll be added to the list when you join, and will need to confirm that you want to receive the updates, but many legacy members do not receive the updates, and sometimes the sign-up widget glitches.
  • Take the course live on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and MAYBE Kobo if they have stopped unilaterally discounting and hard-setting my prices. If they’re still being cute with their goddamned penny discount (which causes me problems with my pricing on Amazon, B&N, AND my own site, I’ll just skip Kobo).

Believe it or not, even with this long list of things yet to do, I’m actually almost done. So if you’re already on the World Clinic Early-Bird or HTTS Bootcamp Update lists, next week is when you need to start watching for [World-Clinic-LIVE] notices.

 

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